Joshua Citarella

Bio

Joshua Citarella

Joshua Citarella (b. 1987) is a New York based artist. His work positions photography at the nexus of an interdisciplinary practice, relegating all mediums to source material awaiting digital image capture. Recent solo exhibitions include Herkimer Place Complex, New York (2018), The Ski Club, Milwaukee (2018), Higher Pictures, New York (2017), and “Ultraviolet Production House: Showroom,” Bahamas Biennale, Detroit (2017). His work was included in the recent group exhibitions “Alt-Facts,” Postmasters Gallery, New York (2017) and “Inside Out Upside Down,” The Photographer’s Gallery, London (2016).

Artist Talk: February 13, 2019

In February, we were joined by New York-based contemporary artist, Joshua Citarella. Citarella’s lecture highlights an expansive practice by focusing on select projects and interests such as his involvement with historically notorious Tumblr art collective The Jogging, accidental audiences, the not-yet-readymades he designed with Brad Troemel for Etsy under the banner of Ultraviolet Production House, startling overlaps between right-wing doomsday preppers and rooftop gardening Pinterest libs, freelance purgatory, the philosophies of politically-radical Instagram posters, and photography. As we move through Citarella’s practice as an image maker, he shows a consistent history of disrupting the art-world status quo. Firmly rooted in the discourse of Post-Internet art, Citarella speaks about how he has expanded its definition to include not only the way in which art is disseminated and consumed by audiences online, but the way in which actual art objects can be realized through web-based platforms and businesses like Amazon and Etsy. Following the lecture, Citarella reflects on social-media’s impact on the art world, and more specifically the art-market itself, with questions such as “why is fine art the last industry to successfully utilize e-commerce?” and “can we diagnose greater social issues from a biopsy of visual material?”. Citarella concludes that a comprehensive analysis of the contemporary image will be key to understanding contemporary culture. Not only is it possible to diagnose social issues through an analysis of image communication, but it is actually essential.